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Proper 12 | Ordinary Time 17 | Pentecost 10 (Cycle C)

Sunday between July 24 and July 30 inclusive

The worship services and the messages for next weekend obviously will be focused on prayer. The texts selected for this occasion (especially Psalm 138, Genesis 18:20-32, and Luke 11:1-13) provide models and guidance about how we as people of God should communicate with God. From these texts we see that our prayers to God should be personal and persistent. God is to be perceived as our concerned but transcendent Father and as our generous and always helpful Friend.

Psalm 138

In Psalm 138 prayer is not a peripheral matter, not an action to be performed in a perfunctory, mechanical way. The psalmist is totally involved in the prayer. Although the Lord (Adonai) is perceived to be high above the psalmist in power and in position, the psalmist claims that the Lord is intimately concerned with those who are powerless and in need. The psalmist proclaims the steadfast love and faithfulness of the Lord openly, within the hearing of the kings of the earth. Just as the Lord has responded to the pleas of the psalmist in the past, the psalmist expects the same personal attention in the present and in the future. In a most respectful way the psalmist is persistent, stating that it would not be advantageous for the Lord to neglect the psalmist. The Lord should not neglect the psalmist, for the psalmist is the work of the Lord’s own hands!

Genesis 18:20-32

This text is perhaps the supreme example in all of our biblical accounts of personal and persistent prayer. Those who composed this account provided in 18:17-19 an introspective view of the Lord. In those verses the Lord is said to be pondering whether to share with Abraham the plans of the Lord to destroy the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah because of the sins of the people who were living there. (It would be preferable to begin our reading with 18:17 rather than with 18:20 so that this introspective view of the Lord would be included.) The Lord is said in Genesis 18:20-21 to be so concerned about the people of the world that the decision to destroy even the most wicked among them will not be made on the basis of reports provided by subordinates. The Lord will make a personal inspection before the final decision for destruction will be made.

In this story Abraham is said to have approached the Lord closely and to have engaged the Lord in a bold though always most respectful manner in a prayer conversation. In this most interesting and persistent intercessory prayer developed and included within the biblical accounts, Abraham requests that the city of Sodom be spared if fifty, or forty-five, or forty, or thirty, or twenty, or even if only ten righteous people can be found there. Using the same persuasive argumentation that would be used in a human-to-human conversation, Abraham is said to have appealed to the sense of justice inherent with the Lord by making the statement that “It would not be consistent with your character to destroy the righteous with the wicked!” A better model for our own personal persistent intercessory prayers cannot be found.

Psalm 85

The reasoning expressed within this prayer is frequently seen in the psalms of the Israelite canonical hymnal. Just as, the psalmist argues, you, O Lord, have acted favorably toward us in the past, please show your favor to us now. Do not continue to be angry with us. In this psalm the psalmist is confident that the Lord will respond affirmatively.

The psalmist speaks personally to the Lord here, much as a person would speak personally to a dear friend. There is a faith-inducing closeness here, making it easier for us even today to address God in prayer. This is one of the most significant blessings that we receive by using the Israelite/Jewish psalms regularly in our private and in our corporate worship and life.

Hosea 1:2-10

There is nothing specifically about prayer in this puzzling text. Should we understand the text rather literally that God actually commanded Hosea to marry a woman who would have two children during their marriage who would be fathered by other men, in order to illustrate the sinfulness of Israel? Should we consider this to be instead a vivid story to demonstrate dramatically the unfaithfulness to the Lord God of many of the people in the Northern Kingdom Israel? Is the account to be understood as a parable or symbolic action that depicts the message of this prophetic document? Did Hosea actually have an unfortunate marriage situation and used it to speak his words of judgment against Israel? Was there some other purpose for this text? Is this a meaningful and helpful text for us to read in our corporate worship and to reflect upon in our sermons? At any rate, the text is enigmatic, challenging, and illustrative of the tremendous variety of materials in the Older Testament. There can be as many interpretations of the text as there are persons to interpret it.

Luke 11:1-13

In the oldest Greek manuscripts of the Lukan “Lord’s Prayer” available to modern text critics, God is simply addressed as “Father.” God is not depicted as “in heaven” or anywhere else beyond our hearing. The earliest Lukan “Lord’s Prayer” is, therefore, characterized by brevity and simplicity. The context given the Lukan “Lord’s Prayer” puts emphasis on Jesus himself praying and, because of the context of the Luke 18:1-5 story about the cold-hearted judge who finally responds to the persistent pleas of the widow who continues to appeal to him, on perseverance in prayer. The Lukan account also uses the technique of comparison between the lesser and the greater in which human-to-human relationships are used as illustrations of the more vital human-to-divine ones. If a friend will eventually relent and meet the needs of an acquaintance who continues to implore him for assistance and if a father will supply good food for his children, how much more will the far-superior heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who persist in their supplications! God, as the greatest Father, will certainly provide the much greater divine gifts to those who persist in their prayers. Therefore, we should continue to pray to God for good things and never become discouraged and discontinue our prayers. We believe that God is a loving Father and not a cold-hearted judge.

Colossians 2:6-15 (16-19)

This text is the third in a series of sequential readings from Colossians over a four week period and has very little connection with the other selections for this occasion, although there is in Colossians 2:7 the mention of thanksgiving and this text does provide some reasons for prayer. The words φιλοσοφιας και κενης απατης in 2:8 should be rendered in our time by something such as “love of human, self-centered wisdom and vain deceitfulness” so that the academic discipline of philosophy is not discredited.

Proper 12 | Ordinary Time 17 | Pentecost 10, Cycle C (2016)

THEME OF THE DAY
God will never abandon us. This theme will lead to sermons on Social Ethics (God’s concern for the lowly) and Justification by Grace, with attention to how we live (Sanctification and Sin).

Psalm 85
This psalm is a prayer for deliverance from national adversity. It is a Korah Psalm, a genre of psalms that are songs of a congregational type. The Korahites were a group of temple singers (2 Chronicles 20:19) who may have assembled several psalms, including this one. It begins with a reference to God’s favor to his land and its people, and how he cared for them and forgave them (taken away their iniquity) in the past (vv. 1-3). This could be taken as a Messianic Prophecy, describing all Christ will do. Petitions for deliverance and mercy [chesed] along with others that Elohim would revive [chayah] are offered in verses 4-7. The bulk of the song includes an oracle of assurance likely delivered by a priest. Yahweh Elohim will speak peace [shalom] to his people, salvation [yesha, safety or ease] is at hand. Love/Mercy and faithfulness will meet, righteousness [tsedeq] and peace [shalom] will kiss each other, and Yahweh will give what is good [tob] (vv. 8-13). Messages of forgiveness (vv. 2-3) and salvation (v. 9) are delivered.

Application: The psalm encourages sermons on Justification by Grace, for God never gives up on his people. References to righteousness (best understood as living in right relationship with God and others [Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol. 1, pp. 370-371]) kissing peace (a state of well-being and thriving in society, for the ancient Hebrews [Ibid., p. 130]) can be used to provide insights into what the Christian life looks like (Sanctification and Social Ethics).

OR

Psalm 138
The Alternative Psalm is a thanksgiving for deliverance from trouble, attributed to David. Again we note that it is unlikely that David is the author of the psalms attributed to him (Brevard Childs, Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture, p. 512). In fact some scholars conclude that references to David in the psalms may be a way of using him to represent the inner life of all his subjects, and so of all the faithful (Ibid., p. 521). This entails that the psalm is to be a thanksgiving by all the faithful. It begins with thanks given in the temple courts (v. 2). Reference is made to giving Yahweh thanks before all the gods (v. 1). This likely refers to a heavenly assembly that surrounds the Lord and may be taken as his supremacy over all the gods [elohim]. The hymn is a prophecy that all the kings of the world will praise God (vv. 4-5). This seems fulfilled in Christianity. The psalm concludes when God is said to be high though he regards the lowly [shaphal or humble], one who preserves us and is a God of steadfast love [chesed, mercy], who does not forsake the work of his hands [yad] (vv. 6-8).

Application: This Alternative Psalm can inspire sermons on God’s supremacy over all society’s false gods and how our God never abandons us, especially not the lowly (Sin, Social Ethics, Justification by Grace).

Hosea 1:2-10
This book of a later prophet is the first installment of Minor Prophets, so named because of the brevity of other books in comparison with Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel. Hosea’s ministry to the Northern Kingdom of Israel in the eighth century BC followed closely upon Amos. But unlike Amos he came from that region. He worked at a time when Israel was suffering from war with Assyria and in virtual anarchy. The prophet’s marriage to the prostitute Gomer and forgiveness of her dramatizes the book’s dominant theme of divine compassion and love.

The lesson begins with Yahweh directing Hosea to marry the whore Gomer, as it is said that Israel had committed whoredom [zanah] by forsaking him. The prophet complies, and she bears him a son (vv. 2-3). The son is to be named (by the Lord) Jezreel (which means “God sows”), for Yahweh says he will punish the house of Jehu (Israel’s king Jeroboam at the time was descended from his lineage) for the blood of Jezreel. Reference is made to Yahweh breaking the bow of Israel in the valley of Jezreel, anticipating Israel’s defeat by Assyria in 722 BC (vv. 4-5). (Jezreel refers to a plain in the central section of Israel associated with violence of the power politics practiced by Israel’s kings in gaining power and wealth.) Then Gomer bore a daughter, and Yahweh named her Lo-ruhamah (which means “Not Pitied”). The Lord says he will have no pity on Israel, but will have pity and save Judah (vv. 6-7). (This reference to Judah may be a later addition to the text.) After his daughter had been weaned, a son was born named Lo-ammi (which means “Not My People”), for Israel is not the people of God, and he is not their God (vv. 8-9). The lesson concludes with a reference to the vast number of people of Israel who will survive and that those who were not the Lord’s people shall be known as “Children of the Living God” (v. 10).

Application: This lesson can help us see we sin in all we do, in order to recognize and appreciate our dependence on God’s grace, that he does not abandon us (Sin and Justification by Grace).

OR

Genesis 18:20-32
We note again how like all five books of the Pentateuch, Genesis is probably the product of several distinct literary traditions. This one is just comprised of three strands: 1) J, a ninth/tenth-century BC source so named for its use of the name Jahweh of Yahweh (translated “Lord”) for God; 2) E, an eighth-century BC source named for its use of the divine name Elohim; and 3) P or Priestly source, dated from the sixth century BC. The lesson, pertaining to Abraham’s intercession on behalf of Sodom and Gomorrah, seems to be the work of J.

Abraham had accompanied the three men [anashim, though in this case, the story probably alludes to angels] who had visited him and Sarah (vv. 1-16), and the Lord decides to give him his counsel given the special role conferred on Abraham (vv. 17-19). Yahweh laments the gravity of the sin [ehattath] of Sodom and Gomorrah (cities which were located at least forty miles south of Jerusalem, perhaps on the Salt Sea). He vows to investigate their sin (vv. 20-21). The men proceed to Sodom while Abraham remained standing before Yahweh. The patriarch begs the Lord not to sweep away the righteous [tsaddiq] with the unrighteous, asking him to spare the cities if fifty righteous can be found. The Judge of the earth should do what is just (vv. 22-25). It is good to remind ourselves again that the concept of “righteousness” even in an Old Testament context is not to imply that one lives in faultless conformity to some moral law. It has to do with living in right relationship with God and others (see the discussion of righteousness above for Psalm 85). We have also previously noted that the Hebraic equivalent term for “righteousness” does not just connote legal, judgmental actions, but when applied to God concerns loyalty in relationships, the loyalty of God to his Covenant Promises (Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol. 1, pp. 373, 376ff). Yahweh accedes to Abraham’s pleas, and then gradually allows the patriarch to bargain him down to just ten righteous in the city being sufficient to ensure its destruction will not transpire (vv.26-32).

Application: Sermons on this Complementary Version of the First Lesson will focus on how God and the faithful (like Abraham) do not want anyone abandoned and that loyalty and love override punishment (Justification by Grace).

Colossians 2:6-15 (16-19)
The book is a circular letter which, much like Philippians, was either written by Paul from prison (4:3, 10, 18) late in his career or by a follower of Paul who had a hand in assembling the collection of his Epistles. These conclusions follow from the fact that the Epistle includes vocabulary and stylistic characteristics different from the indisputably Pauline writings. The letter addresses Christians in a town in Asia Minor (the most eastern part of modern-day Turkey) near Ephesus, whose church, though not likely founded by Paul, was basically in line with his teachings, though threatened by ascetic teachings (2:21, 23), ritual practices rooted in Jewish traditions (2:16), and philosophical speculations (2:8, 20), all of which were related to visionary insights, and perhaps even the heresy of Gnosticism. This is a lesson devoted to warnings against false teachings.

Paul reminds the Colossians that having received Christ they should thankfully continue to live in him, be rooted [rhizoomai] and built up [epoikodomeo] in him (vv. 6-7). He warns that we not be taken captive through philosophy and other empty deceits (v. 8). (We know little of these false teachings that threaten but know they included ascetic elements, ritualism and the worship of angels [vv. 16-18].) Paul proceeds to note that in Christ the whole fullness [pleroma] of God dwells (v. 9). He is the head [kephale] of every ruler. The faithful come to fullness in him (v. 10). They have been circumcised [peritemno] in him with a spiritual circumcision, buried with him in Baptism and raised with him (vv. 11-12; cf. Romans 6:3-5).

Though dead in sin God is said to have made the faithful alive with him as he forgave [charizomai, was gracious] sin (the record), nailing it to the cross (vv. 13-14). Christ is said to have disarmed rulers and authorities, stripping them of their armor (publically embarrassing them) (v. 15). The author warns that the Colossians not allow themselves to be condemned for not practicing the false asceticism, lunar festivals, ritualism, and angel worship that plagued the church (vv. 16, 18). They are said to be only a shadow [skia] of what is the come. The substance/body [soma] belongs to Christ (v. 17). He is said to nourish the whole Body as its head (v. 19).

Application: This is a good lesson for sermons condemning the temptations that social convention (worldly philosophies) have on Christians and the Church (Sin) in order to confirm that Christ fights these temptations for us (Justification by Grace, Atonement, and Sanctification).

Luke 11:1-13
Again we are reminded that this gospel is the first installment of a two-part history of the church traditionally attributed to Luke, a physician and Gentile associate of Paul (Colossians 4:14; 2 Timothy 4:11; Philemon 24). Along with Acts, the author’s intention was to stress the universal mission of the Church (Acts 1:8). This lesson reports on Jesus’ saying about prayer and his teaching of the Lord’s Prayer. Parallel accounts appear in Matthew (6:9-13; 7:7-11).

After finishing prayer, Jesus is asked by a disciple to teach him to pray, as John [the Baptist] had taught his followers (v. 1). Jesus responds by teaching the Lord’s Prayer (vv. 2-4). Then Jesus said to the disciples to suppose each has a friend to whom they go at midnight asking for three loaves of bread with which to entertain a friend who had just arrived (vv. 5-6). The friend says not to bother him when it is so late (v. 7). Jesus notes that this man may not respond because he is a friend, but may respond and arise if there is persistence in the requests (v. 8). He then proceeds to teach that if we knock and ask, these things will be given. Whoever asks God, receives (vv. 9-10).

Jesus then asks the disciples who among them would give their child a snake when a fish was requested or a scorpion instead of the egg requested (vv. 11-12). If we who are evil know how to give good gifts to our children, how much more will the Father give the Holy Spirit [pneuma hagion] to those who ask (v. 13)? New Testament scholar Eduard Schweizer notes that these parables reflect God’s character as Father and friend (The Good News According to Luke, p. 193).

Application: This is a lesson for sermons on prayer and the Holy Spirit’s role in it, a reminder that it is even answered when we do not get what we want (Sanctification and the Holy Spirit).

Proper 6 | Ordinary Time 11, Cycle B (2015)

THEME OF THE DAY: A way out of no way. This is a Sunday for reflecting on how when things look bad, God is always available and present, ready to restore us to thriving (Providence, Justification By Grace, and Sanctification).

Psalm 20
This is a prayer for the king’s victory in battle, purportedly by David.  It was likely composed to accompany a sacrifice offered before a battle had begun (v.3).  It seems useful to reiterate the conclusion of many scholars that references to David in the Psalms like this one may have been a way of using him to represent the inner life of all his subjects and so of all the faithful (Brevard Childs, Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture, p.521).  In that sense this song is about how all Christians do well to pray to God for victories in life.  

God’s actual Name [shem, also translated “renown”] is deemed a sanctuary (v.1).  Prayers are offered that God would send help, remember all our offerings and grant our hearts’ desire (vv.2-5).  The reference to Selah after v.3 is a liturgical direction instructing that there be a musical interlude at this point in the Psalm.  The Psalmist calls for the Lord to help His anointed, answering Him with mighty victories (v.6).  The term anointed [mashiach] refers to Messiah for the Hebrews.  Rather than taking pride in armies, the Psalmist claims to take pride in the Name of Yahweh (v.7).  Those taking pride in their armies, it is said, will collapse and fall, but those taking pride in Yahweh will stand aright (v.8).

Application: Sermons on this Psalm might explore with congregants the battles and struggles in life, that the resources we bring to those struggles are not nearly as useful, not as likely to succeed (Sin), as when we go into them with God and Christ (Providence and Atonement).  The sermon might also highlight how for the Jews the Anointed One is the Messiah.

or

Psalm 92:1-4,12-15
The alternative Psalm is a thanksgiving after deliverance from personal enemies.  This is the only Psalm designated as a Song for the Sabbath Day.  The introductory hymn praises God for His steadfast love [chesed, literally mercy] and faithfulness [emunah, or stability] (vv.1-3).  By the Lord’s Word the Psalmist is made glad [someach] (v.4).  The Lesson skips on to a discussion of the rewards and fruits of righteousness [tsaddiq].  We have noted on a number of occasions that the concept of “righteousness” even in an Old Testament context is not to imply that the believer lives in faultless conformity to some moral norm.  It has to do with living in right relationship with God (Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol.1, pp.370-371).  The Hebrew term for judgment in ancient Hebrew, mishpat, can refer to a sense of comfort, not just to punishment (Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol.1, p.358).  The righteous are said to be planted in the house of the Lord where they will flourish in God’s court (v.13).  The implication is that God is the Agent of righteousness.  Note that reference to the palm tree and the cedars in v.12 connoted prosperity and longevity to the ancient Hebrews.  In old age, fruit is said to be produced (v.14).  This suggests that works follow spontaneously from righteousness/justification.  The works of the righteous show God’s righteousness (v.15).  It is good to remind ourselves at this point that Christian scholarship on the Old Testament largely agrees that God’s righteousness is not so much about a punitive attribute of God as it is about relationship, concerning God’s loyalty to His Covenant in saving us.  Sometimes the righteousness of God is even construed, as perhaps in this Psalm, as something bestowed on the faithful (Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol., pp.373,376ff.).

Application: A sermon on this Psalm might focus on its character as a Sabbath song, that every Sunday we come to sing praises to God for His mercy, love, and stability – His faithfulness to His Promises never to abandon us, even in the midst of the enemies and evils that come our way (Providence).  Another angle for sermons might be to elaborate on the themes of righteousness in the Psalm, how when things look bleakest (Sin), God puts us in right relationship with Him and we may flourish (Justification By Grace and Sanctification).

1 Samuel 15:34–16:13
We have previously noted that this Book has its origin as a distinct text derives from the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures (the Septuagint), which divided the story of Israel’s monarchy into four sections (1 and 2 Samuel, and 1 and 2 Kings).  This Book is probably the result of two or three sources: (1) Early traditions about Samuel and Saul; (2) Editor-molded materials brought together into a connected history, implying a critique of the events, deeming kingship as problematic, and so must be set under the rule of God and Samuel His Prophet; (3) Incorporating the previous strand into the more Deuteronomistic (D) history (the result of sweeping religious reforms under King Josiah in 621 BC).  This is the story of Samuel’s anointing of David to succeed Saul as king.

Having confronted Saul, it is reported that Samuel returned to his home Ramah (about seventeen miles northwest of Jerusalem) and never saw Saul again.  He is said to have grieved over the king’s plight (15:34-35).  The Lord challenges Samuel not to grieve indefinitely, but charges him to go to Jesse (of the tribe of Judah, a grandson of Ruth and Boaz) in Bethlehem, as the next king will be from among his sons (16:1).  As Samuel fears consequences if Saul learns of these actions, the Lord responds to the Prophet that he is to offer a sacrifice to the Lord and invite Jesse.  Further instructions are to be received (16:2-3).  Samuel complies and invites all the elders to join him in the sacrifice after ceremoniously sanctifying themselves through ritual washing.  Among them are Jesse and his sons (16:4-5). 

Samuel meets Jesse’s eldest son Eliab, who was tall and handsome.  Samuel thinks that he must be the one the Lord has chosen, but Yahweh reveals that Eliab is not the one, for the Lord does not look on human beings as they appear outwardly, but considers their heart (16:6-7).  We have already noted in the exposition of Psalm 20 that reference here to the Lord’s anointed is the Hebrews term mashiach, which is linguistically related to the term for Messiah.  Already connections between the (Davidic) king of Israel and the Messiah are being drawn.  Jesse’s second son Abinadab and third son Shammah (elsewhere called Shimeah [2 Samuel 13:3,32] or Shimei [2 Samuel 21:21] are summoned, and Samuel notes that they as well as the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh sons of Jesse are not the chosen one (16:8-10).  Samuel asks to see all of Jesse’s sons; only the youngest (David) who is tending sheep has not been seen.  Samuel would have him be summoned, claiming he would not sit down (not eating the part of the sacrifice not reserved for God) until he sees David (16:11).  Although David is the eighth son in this account, according to I Chronicles 2:13-15 he is seventh son of a seventh son, a widespread Hebrew folklore.  David is said to be ruddy [admoni, either a reference to his complexion or red hair] and quite handsome.  Yahweh directs that he be anointed, and he is given the Spirit [ruach] of the Lord (as Saul and other religious leaders in the Old Testament received) (16:12-13).  See Judges 6:34.

Application: This text readily lends itself to sermons proclaiming a Word of hope (Justification By Grace, Providence, and Social Ethics [esp. for the poor and powerless]) in the midst of despair about present American economic, social, and political realities.     

or

Ezekiel  17:22-24
We have previously noted that Ezekiel was a Prophet from a priestly family whose ministry to his fellow Exiles during the Babylonian Captivity extended from 593 BC to 563 BC.  Some of the oracles pre-date Jerusalem’s fall.  The original collection was rewritten and expanded by an editor.  The Book includes judgment of Judah for its idolatry and defilement of the sanctuary, the proclamation of God’s abiding Presence among the people, consolation and hope expressed in a proclamation of God’s unconditional care.  This Lesson is the Allegory of the Cedar – a Messianic allegory (reminiscent of Jeremiah 23:5-6 and Zechariah 3:8).  Essentially Yahweh Elohim refers to taking a sprig/branch [porah] from the top of a cedar, breaking off a tender one from the top of its twigs, and planting it on a high and lofty mountain [har] (v.22).  Jeremiah (23:5-6) also refers to the Messiah as a branch.  This twig will be planted on the mountain height of Israel, Ezekiel proclaims (presumably the highest point of Jerusalem – Mt. Zion) in order that it may bear fruit [peri] and become a noble cedar on which all birds will live in the shade of its branches (v.23).  This reference to a mountain height in Jerusalem may be consistent with the hope of a restoration of the Davidic monarchy.  All the trees of the field will know then that God is the Lord. But then the tree will be brought low by God, and He will make high [gaboah] the low tree, drying up the green tree and making the dry tree flourish (v.24).   
      
Application: Understood Messianically, this Complementary First Lesson opens the way to sermons on what God does in Christ, in hopeless situations creating from what seems like a little twig (Christology and the lowliness of Christ) and using it and Christ to bring shade and relief to us all (Atonement).  We flourish as we live in Him (Sanctification).

2 Corinthians 5:6–10 (11-13), 14-17
We continue this week again to consider an Epistle written by Paul to address relations with the Corinthian church which had further deteriorated during the period after I Corinthians was written.   As previously noted, Chapters 10-13 are so different in style and tone from the first chapters as to lead many scholars to conclude that they are the “severe letter” mentioned in 2:4.  This Lesson is Paul’s articulation of confidence when facing death.  The middle three verses of the Lesson (vv.11-3) launch the Apostle on a further defense of his ministry and its relation to the Word of Christ.

Paul’s confidence seems to be a function of having experienced the burden of our earthly bodies and the longing for the heavenly dwelling through the Holy Spirit.  Yet there is also an awareness that while at home in our bodies [soma] we are away from the Lord (vv.6,4-5).  As a result, Paul notes that we must walk by faith, not by sight (v.7).  There is a preference in the faithful to be with the Lord away from the body (v.8).  Whether at home with the Lord or away, it is the aim of Christians to please Him (v.9). 

Reference is made to the fact that all will be judged [bema, appear before a tribunal] by Christ for what they have done (v.10).  It is useful at this point to remember that Paul was a Jew, and for the ancient Hebrews the term mishpat (judgment) refers both to punishment and also a sense of comfort for the faithful, and that this sense of comfort may be what Paul has in mind here.  The Apostle speaks of knowing the fear [phobon, a concept which implied reverence for the Biblical-era Hebrews] of the Lord and makes efforts to persuade the Corinthians, not by boasting about himself, but so that the Corinthians might be loyal to him in face of critics who proclaim themselves in their ministry (vv.11-12).  As a number of Paul’s critics had claimed ecstatic experiences of the Spirit (I Corinthians 12), he seems to contend to be undergoing such an experience [ekestemen, besides ourselves] (v.13).  The love [agape] of Christ controls/constrains [sunekei] us, he claims, for we are convinced that Christ has died for all (vv.14-15a).  As a result of Christ’s Work, those who live no longer live for themselves, but for Christ Who died and was raised for them (v.15b).  Consequently, Paul claims to regard no one from a human point of view [kata sarka], though Christ was once known from such a point of view (v.16).  Judging from such a perspective involves merely noting the outward appearance of what people do.  As a result, anyone who is in Christ is said to be a new creation [koina ktisis], for all that is old has passed away and become new (v.17; cf. Isaiah 43:18-19; 65:17; 66:22; Galatians 6:1-5; Ephesians 2:15).

Application: This is a text for proclaiming how we have been made new (people who live for others and are no longer chained by the past) by Christ.  Preachers can make clear that God’s love constrains us to do good, that we can do no other (Justification By Grace, Sanctification, and Realized Eschatology).

Mark 4:26-34
Once again we consider a text in the first of the Synoptic Gospels to be written, a Book that was perhaps the source of other Gospels, perhaps based on oral traditions of the Passion narrative and accounts of Jesus’ sayings (the so-called Q-source).  Probably written prior to the fall of Jerusalem in 70AD, this anonymous work is traditionally ascribed to John Mark, perhaps referred to as an associate of Paul (Acts  12:12-25; 15:37; Colossians 4:10) or as Peter’s scribe (I Peter 5:13).  Some speculate that the original audience was the church in Rome (esp. Gentiles), as it presumes readers unfamiliar with Jewish customs and Palestinian geography (see 7:2-4,31), but it also could have been written for Palestinian Christians.

The Lesson reports Jesus’ Parables of the seed growing secretly (vv.26-29) and of the mustard seed (vv.30-32).  The first Parable, with no parallels in the other Gospels, sends the message that the Kingdom of  God [Basileia tou Theou] grows and sprouts while we sleep, is produced by the earth, but when ripe is harvested.  References to the use of the sickle and harvest in v.29 may suggest the Final Judgment, as eschatological orientation typical of Mark (see Joel 3:13; Revelation 14:14-20, for the eschatological use of these images).  One’s life depends totally on God’s act, not on our own. 

The Mustard Seed Parable has close parallels in the other Synoptic accounts (Matthew 13:31-33 and Luke 13:18-19), especially to the Matthean version.  The Parable reminds us that the Kingdom of God is like the smallest of seeds becoming the greats of shrubs.  It gives shelter to the birds.  The reference to shelter for birds suggests Daniel 4:21 (or Ezekiel 31:6), entailing that the Kingdom includes all nations (also see 13:10).  The pericope concludes with a description of Jesus teaching all things in Parables [parabole], telling them only as much as they could understand, though He did explain them privately to His Disciples (a point not made in the parallel Matthean version (vv.33-34; cf. Matthew 13:34-35).  Only the Presence of Jesus, it seems, can clarify such matters.
     
Application: This is a text for sermons on the unexpected character of the Work of God and Gospel and of the good things life (Providence, Justification By Grace, and Sanctification).   

Proper 10 | Ordinary Time 15, Cycle B (2015)

THEME OF THE DAY:  It’s all in God’s hands.  The texts invite us to celebrate our being lost in grace in all our undertakings (Justification By Grace, Sanctification, Church, Worship, and Social Ethics).

Psalm 24
This Psalm has been attributed to David.  It is a liturgy on entering the sanctuary of the Jerusalem Temple, perhaps in connection with a procession of the Ark of the Covenant.  It seems useful to reiterate the conclusion of many scholars that references to David in the Psalms like this one may have been a way of using him to represent the inner life of all his subjects and so of all the faithful (Brevard Childs, Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture, p.521).  In that sense this song is about the mandate that all the faithful worship Yahweh, with confidence that He is Present in worship.  At two points in the Psalm the word Selah appears, suggesting times when musical interludes were to be played.        

The Psalm begins with an acknowledgement of the Lord as Creator, that the earth is Yahweh’s.  Reference to His founding the earth on the seas is suggestive of the Creation Account in Genesis (1:2,6) (vv.1-2).  The Psalmist grapples with the question of who should be admitted to the sanctuary (v.3).  The answer to the question is given: Only those with clean hands and pure hearts, who do not lift themselves to what is false (vv.4-6).  Whether this entails one must have sufficient moral qualities or simply travel with God is an open question (perhaps it is both).  In another Psalm concerned with worthiness to enter the sanctuary (132:9), righteousness [tsedaqah] is deemed essential.  We should highlight once again that the concept of “righteousness” even in an Old Testament context is not to imply that the believer lives in faultless conformity to some moral norm.  It has to do with living in right relationship with God (Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol.1, pp.370-371).  In the Psalm’s final verses, the choir outside the gate requests entrance, so that the God of Israel in the Ark may enter.  He is praised as the King [melek] of Glory [kabod] (vv.7-10).           

Application: A sermon on this Psalm affords an opportunity to reflect on worship, on how God is Present in our sanctuaries, and so worship is in His hands.  Even our worthiness to worship is not a matter of what we do, but the relationship He creates with us.  It is His Presence that makes us worthy to worship (Justification By Grace and Sanctification). 

or

Psalm 85:8-13
This is prayer for deliverance from national adversity. It is a Psalm of the Korahites (a group of professional Levitical musicians).  Thus the verses seem to have origins in The Jerusalem Temple.  The opening reference to God’s favor to His land and its people (v.1) could be occasioned by the return of the Exiles from captivity in Babylon.  But it could also be taken as Messianic Prophecy, describing all Christ will do.  The bulk of the Lesson (vv.8-13) includes an oracle of assurance, likely delivered by a priest.  A message of salvation/safety [yesha] (v.9) is  delivered.  Righteousness [tsedeq] and peace [shalom] are said to kiss each other (v.10).  We should highlight once again that the concept of “righteousness” even in the Old Testament has to do primarily with living in right relationship with God.  See the discussion of the concept above in the preceding Psalm.  Thus the term in this case could refer to a vision of a just society or merely to what happens to faithful people through God’s justifying grace.  And peace [shalom] in this Jewish context refers not just to a state in which there is no combat, but to a state of well-being and thriving, to social justice (Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol.1, p.130).  Right relationship with God leads to a state of well being (Justification By Grace, Sanctification, and Social Ethics).  Likewise mercy [chesed, or loving kindness] and truth/faith [emeth] are said to meet.  Love and faith go together.  Salvation [yesha , also translated “safety”] and these new realities are said to be close at hand for those who fear [yare, that is “reverence”] Yahweh (v.9).   Thus there is a clear eschatological dimension at this point in the text, which fits the viability of interpreting the text as a Prophecy of Christ’s Coming.  Yahweh, it is said, will give what is good [tob], and this gift is related to the righteousness (restored relationship He will work out with us) going before Him like a herald before a king and also to the faithfulness [emeth, properly translated “truth”] which will spring from it (vv.11-13).  Again it seems clear that when God acts with righteousness (faithful to the Covenant relationship with the His people), faith and all good follow (Sanctification As Spontaneous Good Works).

Application: The Psalm gives occasion to celebrate God’s forgiving love and goodness (Justification By Grace and Providence), but also to relate this to what God is about to do in Christ the Coming One.  Not only do we find a loving God described here in the Old Testament, but also a vision of the Christian life (Sanctification and Social Ethics) springing spontaneously from God’s righteous actions.  The future and even our good works are in God’s hands.

2 Samuel 6:1-5,12b-19
We have already noted that the origin of this Book as a distinct text derives from the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures (the Septuagint), which divided the story of Israel’s monarchy into four sections (1 and 2 Samuel, and 1 and 2 Kings).  This Book is probably the result of two or three sources: (1) Early traditions about Samuel and Saul; (2) Editor-molded materials brought together into a connected history, implying a critique of the events, deeming kingship as problematic, and so must be set under the rule of God and Samuel His Prophet; (3) Incorporating the previous strand into the more Deuteronomistic (D) history (the result of sweeping religious reforms under King Josiah in 621 BC).  The role of this last source not surprisingly entails that a central theme in the Book is the struggle to remain obedient to Torah, to be God’s covenant people, and to inherit divine blessings.  This Book especially relates to the reign of David as King of Israel.  This is the story of David’s bringing the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem in order to add to the city’s prestige as the new capital and Saul’s daughter Michal’s negative reaction to it.

The account begins with David gathering the chosen men of Israel to go to Baale-juhad (an error or another name for Kiriath-jearim) where The Ark of the Covenant (where Yahweh was thought to reside) was enthroned in order to bring it to Jerusalem (vv.1-2).  This would add to the prestige of David’s capital, as with the Ark present in the city it would become not just the military and political center of Israel, but also its religious center.  Uzzah and Ahio are charged with transporting the Ark.  They were sons of Abinadab who had been guarding the Ark (vv.3-4; I Samuel 7:2).  David and many in Israel celebrate with dance (v.5).  As the Ark came to Jerusalem, one of David’s wives Michal, the daughter of Saul, saw the new king dancing [karar] a ritual and despised him (vv.12,14-15).  She may have been angered over having been torn away from her husband Paltiel (3:15-16) so David could claim more legitimacy for assuming the throne.  Or she may have been embarrassed by the scant clothing he wore while dancing (v.20).  Even David assumed the priestly task of offering a sacrifice [alah] (vv.17-18a).  He then blessed [barak] the people in Yahweh’s Name and distributed food (vv.18b-19).     

Application: This is a great text for extolling the joy of worship, an even that takes us out of ourselves and into God’s hands.

or

Amos 7:7-15
The Complementary First Lesson is drawn from a collection of teaching and traditions concerning a Prophet who may have written during the prosperous reign of Jeroboam II in Israel (786 BC – 746 BC).  From Judah, Amos did his prophesying in the Northern Kingdom, but then after The Babylonian Exile may have returned to Judah to write a summary of his proclamation.  Some scholars contend that his addresses were gathered and combined by others to form the book.  This Lesson is a portion of the five visions of God’s judgment and restoration given to Amos and his confrontation with Amaziah, the official priest of the Northern Kingdom’s royal sanctuary in Bethel (v.10).  Yahweh reveals a wall with a plumb line to symbolize that Israel is warped beyond correction and so must be destroyed (vv.7-9).  Amaziah reports to King Jereboam that Amos was conspiring against him (vv.10-11).  Amaziah admonishes Amos to flee to Judah and cease prophesying in Bethel (vv.12-13).  Amos responds that he is no Prophet [nabi] (not part of a prophetic order common in Israel and Judah), but a herdsman summoned by Yahweh to prophecy (vv.14-15).

Application: This Lesson offers opportunities to speak out prophetically against injustices in America (Sin and Social Justice), critiquing the Church for its cooption by the establishment, but to proceed with confidence that we have been summoned by God to these undertakings, that all we can co it dependent on Him (Providence and Sanctification).

Ephesians 1:3-14
The Book is a circular letter, either written by Paul from prison late in his career or by a follower of the Apostle who had had a hand in assembling the collection of his Epistles.  These conclusions follow from the fact that the Letter includes vocabulary and stylistic characteristics different from the Pauline corpus.  It was likely addressed to a younger, later generation of Christians (1:15).

This Lesson is a thanksgiving for the blessing God has showered on the cosmos.  The blessings are related to our being elected [eklego, literally “chosen”] in Christ destined for adoption as children (vv.3-5,11).  He is said to be the Beloved [agapao] (v.6).  In Christ redemption [apolutrosiss – a loosing away] through His blood is given by grace [charis] lavished/abounded [perisseuo] on us (vv.7-8).  Reference is made to this being a mystery [musterion], an age-long purpose discussed now in the fullness of time [pleromatos ton kairon -- an eschatological image] (vv.9-10).  All things are gathered up [anakefalaiosasthai, to head up] in Christ.  This could refer to the Church as the Body of Christ or to all the world redeemed in Christ.  The Holy Spirit, said to be given to seal [chatham] or as a pledge [arrhaban, literally “earnest”] of our redemption, is given with faith in Christ (vv.13-14; cf. 1:22).

Application: This Lesson invites sermons explaining (Single) Predestination and its implications for our unity in Christ (Church) as well as the comfort this insight provides (Justification By Grace).

Mark 6:14-29
As is well known, this Book is likely the oldest of the Synoptic Gospels.  It was probably written prior to the fall of Jerusalem in 70 AD and was the source of other Gospels.  It is likely based on oral traditions of the Passion narrative and accounts of Jesus’ sayings (the so-called Q-source).

Although an anonymous work, the tradition of ascribing authorship to John Mark  is largely accepted, but his identity is not always clear – whether this is the John Mark referred to as an associate of Paul (Acts 12:12,25; 15:37; Colossians 4:10) or as Peter’s scribe (I Peter 5:13).  There is an extra-Biblical source (Eusebius of Caesarea, in Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, 2/1: 115-116) who designates Mark as the Apostle to Africa.  Some speculate that the original audience was the church in Rome (esp. Gentiles), as it presumes readers unfamiliar with Jewish customs and Palestinian geography (see 7:2-4,31), but it also could have been written for Palestinian Christians.  In this Lesson the beheading of John the Baptist is recounted along with Herod’s fears about Jesus.  The Markan version has more details than the other Gospels with only Matthew 14:3-12 providing the actual account of John’s death. 

Herod Antipas (the Roman tetrarch of Galilee, reigning during Jesus’ adulthood) is reported to have heard of Jesus’ Ministry and those of His Disciples.  Some say Jesus is a reincarnation of Elijah or one of the other Prophets.  Others believe that John the Baptist had risen.  Herod becomes convinced of the latter, for he had beheaded John (vv.14-16).  The account of John’s beheading follows.  Only here and in Matthew (14:1-12) are such details provided.  John is put to death by Herod for critiquing him for marrying a niece, Herodias, also the wife of his brother (vv.17-18; cf. Leviticus 18:16; 20:21).  Herodias is especially desirous of John’s death (v.19).  Herodias’ daughter [named Herodias, but actually named Salome] provides an opportunity to have her wish fulfilled, as Herodius has her dance before Herod and guests at a party in such a way as to please the ruler and in gratitude to her and her mother anything she wished David pledges to grant.  Guided by her mother she asks for John the Baptist’s head (vv,21-25).  The king is grieved [perilupos], but grants the request out of duty.  John is arrested and killed (vv.26-28).  John’s disciples claim the body and bury it (v.29).

Application: Sermons on this text can help the congregation appreciate the need for and risks involved in prophetic courage, focusing either on a pressing congregational issue or pressing social concern (Social Justice and Sin), proclaiming our total dependence on God (Justification By Grace).

Proper 8 | Ordinary Time 13, Cycle B (2015)

THEME OF THE DAY:  God delivers: There’s lots of reasons to be grateful!  Texts for this Sunday remind us that God forgives us and overcomes all evil, that suffering is not His Will and that He gives us the true riches in life (Providence, Justification By Grace, and Sanctification as a life of gratitude for all He gives us).

Psalm 130
As previously noted, this is a lament prayer for deliverance from personal trouble.  It is one of the Songs of Ascent (or Pilgrim Psalms).   Recall that such Psalms are so-named for referring to the ascent of pilgrims to Jerusalem on the way to the Temple, which required of them an ascent up a mountain.  (Some instead claim that these Psalms are so named because they have an ascending style of poetic form.)

The Psalmist cries out for help out of the depths [maamaqqim] (vv.1-2).  He notes that though none are worthy to stand before God, yet He is forgiving [selchah, a sending away], not marking [shamar, literally observing] iniquities (vv.3-4).  God is portrayed as a God of steadfast love [the Hebrew term chesed is used here, and so can be translated “loving kindness” or “mercy”].  Comments in v.6 suggest that ancient Hebrews believed that God’s help often came in the early morning after a night of prayer.  Finally, the Psalmist assures that He will redeem [padah, also meaning “free”] Israel, presumably from all its national difficulties (vv.7-8).

Application: This Psalm invites sermons on God’s love, how He overlooks our Sin, even as we wallow them and the despair we often experience (Justification By Grace), or how He delivers or sets our nation free from destructive patterns like the growing poverty and racial injustice.

or

Psalm 30
This is a thanksgiving for healing (or restoration).  It is said to be a Song at the dedication of The Jerusalem Temple, which may indicate that it was used at the Feast of Dedication (Hannukkah) after Judas Maccabeus cleansed The Temple in 164 BC.  The Psalm is attributed to David.  It seems useful to reiterate the conclusion of many scholars that references to David in the Psalms like this one may have been a way of using him to represent the inner life of all his subjects and so of all the faithful (Brevard Childs, Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture, p.521).  In that sense this song is about how all the faithful are to give thanks.

The Psalm begins with praise [rum, extolling] for God not letting the Psalmist’s foes/enemies [oyebh] to rejoice over him (vv.1-2).  These foes could be those who claimed that the illness the Psalmist endured was a deserved punishment of God.  Yahweh is said to have brought the Psalmist up from Sheol [the Pit, or abode of death removed from God’s Presence].  (Mention of the soul [nephesh] at this point is a reference to the breath of life, not indicative of the Hebrews’ belief in a distinct eternal entity like the ancient Greeks and many Christians teach.)  The Psalmist noted that before enduring his trial he had felt secure (vv.6-7a).  Then with illness, as God hid His face [panim] from the Psalmist (cf. 10:1), he turns to God, noting that God gains nothing with his death since dust cannot praise God (vv.8-10), and God restores health, clothing the Psalmist with joy/gladness [simchah].  Reference to the Psalmist taking off his sackcloth refers to removing the clothing of mourning or penitence (vv.11-12).  Another testimony to a strong doctrine of Providence emerges.  God’s wrath seems subordinate to His love (v.5).

Application: A sermon on this text allows preachers to explore how God heals when we least expect it, when things seem worst (Providence).   This insight helps make the Christian life a little less secure, but one filled with rejoicing (Sanctification).  We have a God of love Who works to deliver us, often in surprising ways.

2 Samuel 1:1, 17-27
The origin of this Book as a distinct text derives from the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures (the Septuagint), which divided the story of Israel’s monarchy into four sections (1 and 2 Samuel, and 1 and 2 Kings).  This Book is probably the result of two or three sources: (1) Early traditions about Samuel and Saul; (2) Editor-molded materials brought together into a connected history, implying a critique of the events, deeming kingship as problematic, and so must be set under the rule of God and Samuel His Prophet; (3) Incorporating the previous strand into the more Deuteronomistic (D) history (the result of sweeping religious reforms under King Josiah in 621 BC).  The role of this last source not surprisingly entails that a central theme in the Book is the struggle to remain obedient to Torah, to be God’s covenant people, and to inherit divine blessings.  This Book especially relates to the reign of David as King of Israel.  This particular text is David’s lament over the deaths of Saul and Jonathan.

The scene is set after Saul’s death while David’s army had just defeated the Amalekites.  Informed by a messenger (vv.2-4), David offers laments over Saul and his son Jonathan.  He orders that the Song of the Bow from a lost book of Jashar (a collection of poetry praising Israel’s military victories) be taught in Judah (vv.17-18).  This may be the oldest song in the Bible and is the one most likely to have been an authentic composition of David.  The song begins with a lament concerning how the mighty [Israel’s beauty] have fallen (vv.19,27).  The news is not to be shared with the Philistines.  (Gath and Ashkelon were Philistine cities.) (v.20).  Saul and Jonathan are praised (vv.22-23).  The daughters of Israel are urged to weep, for Saul had clothed with luxury and expensive jewelry (v.24).  David expresses deep love for Jonathan, a love [ahobah] more wonderful than the love of women (v.26).

Application: Sermons in this Lesson will proclaim God’s gracious Providence in leading to the good things we have in life, in order that we may come to gratitude toward Him and to those we have encountered along the way (Sanctification).

or

Lamentations 3:22-33    
This Book is a small psalter of communal laments over Jerusalem followings its destruction by the Babylonians in 577 (586) BC.  Traditionally ascribed to Jeremiah (because of 2 Chronicles 35:25) the thought and diction are sufficiently unlike that of the Prophet to make his authorship unlikely.  The first four chapters are alphabetic acrostics (with a stanza for each of the twenty letters of the Hebrew alphabet). In this Chapter the sadness of the people are voiced by an individual.  In this Lesson the psalmist counsels penitence in acknowledgment of God’s righteousness and mercy.

God’s steadfast love [chesed, or mercy], it is proclaimed, never ceases (v.22).  His mercies are said to be new every morning, His faithfulness great.  Yahweh is said to be His portion, in Whom we can hope [yachal] (vv.23-24).  Yahweh is good [tob] to those who wait for Him, to the soul that seeks Him (v.25).   The writer states that it is good to wait quietly for the [teshuah, literally “safety”] salvation of the Lord, to bear the yoke it youth and it alone in silence, to put one’s mouth in the dust [to abase oneself] that there may be hope [tiguah] (vv.26-29).  It is good to take the insults (v.30).  Yahweh will not reject forever, we are assured.  For although He causes grief, He will have compassion according to the abundance of His steadfast love [chesed] (vv.31-32).    It is added that God does not willingly [from His heart] afflict/lower [anah] or grieve [yagah] anyone (v.33).

Application: Preaching on this Complementary First Lesson leads to sermons proclaiming God’s abundant and steadfast love, that suffering and bad times are not His will (Providence and Justification By Grace).   

2 Corinthians 8:7-15
We continue this week again to consider an Epistle written by Paul to address relations with the Corinthian church which had further deteriorated during the period after I Corinthians was written.   As previously noted, Chapters 10-13 are so different in style and tone from the first chapters as to lead many scholars to conclude that they are the “severe letter” mentioned in 2:4.  

The Lesson is an exhortation to support the collection Paul was organizing for relief of the Jerusalem church.  Praising the Corinthians’ faith in view of love for them, he urges their involvement in this collection as a test [dokimazo, literally “proving”] of the genuineness of their love, but not as command [epitogen] (vv.7-8).  Paul speaks of Christ’s generosity, that though rich [ploutizo] He became poor [ptochos] so that by His poverty we become rich (v.9).  He notes that the offering begun in the previous year (presumably interrupted due to strained relations with the Corinthian church) should be completed (vv.10-11).  The Apostle refers to eagerness to give, regarding a gift as acceptable, not according to the amount.  He proceeds to speak of the Corinthians’ abundance [perisseuma] compared to other churches (vv.12-14).  He cites Exodus 16:18, that one who had much did not have too much, and one with little did not have too little (v.15).

Application: This is a good Lesson for preaching on how the Word of God makes us rich (Justification By Grace and Sanctification), though not in terms of material blessings we “deserve” (a condemnation of our Sin), but by gaining an appreciation of Christ.  God’s propensity to confound reason and the ways of the world is also implicit (Providence).    Distinctions between proving ourselves as Christians and the Christian life as a response to Commandments (Sanctification) might also receive attention.

Mark 5:21-43
As is well known, this Book is likely the oldest of the Synoptic Gospels.  Some speculate that this Gospel’s original audience was the church in Rome (esp. Gentiles), as it presumes readers unfamiliar with Jewish customs and Palestinian geography (see 7:2-4,31), but it also could have been written for Palestinian Christians.  This Lesson is the story of the raising of Jairus’ daughter.  More details are provided in Mark’s account than in the other Synoptic equivalents (cf. Matthew 9:18-26; Luke 8:40-56).

Jesus and the Disciples land their boat on the coast of the Sea of Galilee.  He meets Jairus, a leader of a local synagogue, who pleads with Jesus to heal his daughter (vv.21-23).  The request that Jesus heal by laying on hands was not characteristic of Jewish healing in this era, but was typical of Jesus’ style (6:5; 7:32; 8:22,25).  On the way to Jarius’ house, a healing of a woman suffering from hemorrhages [puseihaimatus, flow of blood] transpires when she touches Jesus’ clothes (vv.24b-29).  When confronted by Him she concedes in fear and trembling that she was the one healed and shows Him homage.  He praises her for her faith (vv.30-34).  The Semitic farewell “go in peace” [hupage eis irenen] suggests a wholeness involved in Jesus’ healings.  For peace in ancient Jewish culture refers not just to a state of no combat, but to a state of well-being, of justice (Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol.1, p.130).

Jairus is next informed that his daughter had died.  Jesus hears the report and assures Jairus (vv.35-36).  Only Peter, James, and John the brother of James proceed to accompany Jesus (v.37).  Mourning had already begun for the daughter when Jesus and His followers arrive.  When He claims that she is merely sleeping He is mocked (vv.37-40a).  Jesus proceeds to raise the girl “immediately/instantly” [eutheos] (vv.40-42a).  Only in the Markan version are Jesus’ actual Semitic/Aramaic words in the healing reported.  All are said to be amazed [exestesan] (v.42b).  But Jesus orders them to keep the healing secret (v.43).  (Matthew’s version [13:58] does not include this reference to the Messianic Secret – the Markan theme [1:33,44; 3:11-12; 7:36; 9:9,30] that Jesus’ Messiahship is to remain a secret except among the faithful until the Resurrection.)    

Application: With this text preachers might proclaim the comfort of the Gospel when facing the trials of life and death (Justification By Grace) and the hope of life eternal (Future Eschatology), helping the flock to appreciate that if we are confident that death is conquered the other trials of life (including injustice) are overcome.  (See the discussion of peace above.)  Another possibility might be to focus on the Messianic Secret, on how Jesus is not fully known    
by people (why so many reject Him) apart from God’s deliverance of Him and us on Easter (Apologetics and Atonement).  

Proper 9 | Ordinary Time 14, Cycle B (2015)

THEME OF THE DAY:  God and His people get in the trenches.  Providence, Social Justice, Justification By Grace, and Sanctification are the doctrines which best express this theme, implicit in all the texts.

Psalm 48
This Korahite Psalm is a song celebrating the beauty and security of Jerusalem’s Mount Zion (the oldest and highest part of the city).  Recall the Korahites were a group of Temple singers (2 Chronicles 20:19).  They may have collected and transmitted a number of Psalms attributed to them.

The Lord is praised as the God of Jerusalem, its sure defense in providing refuge (vv.1-4).  The text’s claim that the city’s Mount Zion is the joy of all the earth.  Reference to the mountain being in the north is a Hebrew play on words for Canaanite Mount Zaphon, a divine dwelling place in Canaanite mythology.  The Hebrew word for “North,” tsaphon, resembles the Canaanite name of the mountain (v.2).  When in the last days Gentile kings unite to attack the city, it is prophesied that they will be routed.  The ships of Tarshsish to be shattered refer to the Phoenician colony of Tarshish (vv.4-8).  The appearance of the term Selah after v.8 is a liturgical directive likely calling for an instrumental interlude at that point.  This insight regarding the steadfast love [chesed, or mercy] of God causes rejoicing in the ceremonies of The Temple (vv.9-11).  A call for a procession about the city’s walls concludes the Psalm.  God is said to be our guide forever [nahaq] (vv.12-14).       

Application: This text suggests sermons on God’s involvement in our cities and other political realities – a most appropriate Word in view of the recent July 4 celebrations.  He is our loving guide in all things in life.  Providence, Sanctification, and Social Ethics might get attention when guided by the Psalm.  

or

Psalm 123
This is a prayer for deliverance from enemies, a group lament.  The Psalm is also a Song of Ascent (a pilgrim song [or plea by an oppressed class in Israel], so named because one needed to ascend Mount Zion to get to the Temple in Jerusalem).  It begins with an act of submission to God’s Will.  The group pledges to look to the Lord until He has mercy [chanan] (vv.1-2).  The actual prayer follows: God is petitioned for mercy in view of all the contempt and scorn experienced by the people from the contempt [buz] of the proud [yannah, or those who oppress] (vv.3-4).

Application: Sermons on this Psalm might focus on submitting to God’s Will (Sanctification and Providence).  Prayerfully anticipating God’s special concern and mercy for the oppressed, this is an excellent opportunity to proclaim God’s preferential option for the poor (Social Ethics).

2 Samuel 5:1-5,9-10
The origin of this Book as a distinct text derives from the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures (the Septuagint), which divided the story of Israel’s monarchy into four sections (1 and 2 Samuel, and 1 and 2 Kings).  This Book is probably the result of two or three sources: (1) Early traditions about Samuel and Saul; (2) Editor-molded materials brought together into a connected history, implying a critique of the events, deeming kingship as problematic, and so must be set under the rule of God and Samuel His Prophet; (3) Incorporating the previous strand into the more Deuteronomistic (D) history (the result of sweeping religious reforms under King Josiah in 621 BC).  The role of this last source not surprisingly entails that a central theme of the  Book is the struggle to remain obedient to Torah, to be God’s covenant people, and to inherit divine blessings.  This Book especially relates to the reign of David as King of Israel.  And so it is appropriate that in this text David is anointed king over all Israel and makes Jerusalem the capital.

With the death of the last of Saul’s heirs (4:1-12), the tribes of Israel reportedly came to Hebron (about twenty miles southwest of Jerusalem) to make David (already king of Judah [2:1-11]) king of the whole nation of Israel.  They note his military victories and the Lord’s Will.  Yahweh has designated him as the one to feed them, they claim (vv.1-2).  David makes a covenant [berith] with the people before the elders anoint him (v.3).  This seems to have been a covenant not like the one between God and Israel, which is an agreement between parties of unequal status, but in this case one among equals (Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol.1, pp.129-130).  He is said to have been thirty years old at the time and to have reigned forty years (a Biblical expression for “a long time”).  Seven of these years are reported as his reign in Hebron only over Judah and the remaining 33 in Jerusalem over Judah and Israel (the Northern Kingdom) (vv.4-5).  Several intervening verses (6-8) describe David’s conquest of Jerusalem, defeating resident Canaanites (the Jebusites) (see I Chronicles 11:4-9).  David’s interest in the city seemed to be a function of its neutral position between Judah and Israel, and so was an ideal capital for the united Hebrew nation.  It is reported that he occupies the whole city and calls the stronghold the City of David (v.9).   It is also said that because Yahweh was with him he became greater and greater (v.10).

Application: Several sermon options emerge from this Lesson.  David offers a model for leadership, with his willingness to covenant with the people, to subordinate his authority (Ministry, Social Ethics).  Also we are reminded that the more we are with God, take Him into the trenches with us, the greater we become (Sanctification).

or

Ezekiel 2:1-5
Ezekiel was a Prophet from a priestly family whose ministry to his fellow Exiles during the Babylonian Captivity extended from 593 BC to 563 BC.  Some of the oracles pre-date Jerusalem’s fall.  The original collection was rewritten and expanded by an editor.  The Book includes judgment of Judah for its idolatry and defilement of the sanctuary, the proclamation of God’s abiding Presence among the people, consolation and hope expressed in a proclamation of God’s unconditional care.  This text is the first of five commissions given to the Prophet.

Yahweh says to the Prophet, calling him son of man (ben, meaning mortal man], to stand on his feet and speak with the Lord.  These words lead to the Spirit [ruach] entering into him which places Ezekiel on his feet (vv.1-2).  Yahweh sends him to the people of Israel, a nation of rebels [marad] who with their ancestors have transgressed against Him (v.3).  They are said to be impudent and stubborn, and Ezekiel is charged to say to them, “Thus says the Lord.” (v.4).  Whether they hear or refuse to hear, they shall know that there has been a Prophet [nabi] among them (v.5).

Application: This is text for preaching prophetic condemnations of injustices in America, helping the flock see that we have become a nation of rebels (Social Ethics).  Like Ezekiel, however, we can only proceed in such a ministry with the Holy Spirit and an awareness that there is hope in God’s Providential care (Justification By Grace).    

2 Corinthians 12:2-10
We continue this week again to consider an Epistle written by Paul to address relations with the Corinthian church which had further deteriorated during the period after I Corinthians was written.   As previously noted, Chapters 10-13 are so different in style and tone from the first chapters as to lead many scholars to conclude that they are the “severe letter” mentioned in 2:4.

In this Lesson we read an even stronger defense by Paul of his ministry.  He boasts by way of making the case for his paradoxical strength in weakness.

Paul begins by seeming to refer to his Damascus Road experience, being caught up to the third heaven ([triptois ourances] an expression for the highest ecstasy) (vv.2-4).  He wants to boast about these revelations but take no credit for them, boasting only about his own weaknesses (vv.5-7a).  He refers to his thorn [skolops] in the flesh (what it is, is not clear).  He concludes that it was given to him to keep him from being too elated and to have him boast of his weaknesses so the power of Christ [dunamis tou Christou] may dwell [episkiazo, or overshadow] in him (vv.7b-9).  This enables Paul to be content with weaknesses, insults, and persecutions.  For when he is weak, he is strong [dunatos, or powerful] (v.10).

Application: This text can lead to sermons that offer hope and comfort for those who feel weak and powerless, stressing that grace overshadows our weaknesses and inadequacies (Sin), that God gets in the trenches with us and takes charge of our lives.  Both Justification By Grace and Sanctification are themes to be stressed. 

Mark 6:1-13
As is well known, this Book is likely the oldest of the Synoptic Gospels.  Some speculate that the original audience was the church in Rome (esp. Gentiles), as it presumes readers unfamiliar with Jewish customs and Palestinian geography (see 7:2-4,31), but it also could have been written for Palestinian Christians.  The account is the story of Jesus’ rejection in his hometown, after sparking some astonishment [ekplessomai] in the synagogue by His teaching [sophia, literally wisdom] (vv.1-2).  He is demeaned for merely being a carpenter, the son of Mary and his brothers and sister known in town (v.3).  (No reference is made to Joseph.  But He is said to be a carpenter’s son in the parallel account in Matthew 13:55.)  Jesus responds by claiming a prophet [prophetes] is without honor in his hometown (v.4).  Only in Mark is it reported that Jesus could do no deeds of power [dunamin], except cure a few who were sick through the laying on of hands (v.5).  He is reportedly amazed [thaumazo, literally “marvelled’] at the unbelief of those who were present (v.6).  Apparently God can be thwarted, but not entirely, by our lack of faith.  He is concealed in the commonplace things of life.  (Many more details are given in the parallel Lukan account [4:16-30], and it is not as clearly stated that Jesus’ power was limited by unfaith.) 

What follows is a report of the instruction of the Twelve Disciples and their commissioning (vv.7-12).  The parallel accounts in Matthew (9:35; 10:1,9-11,14) and Luke (9:1-6) do not like Mark follow the story of His rejection.  Jesus urges them to shed extra belongings (including money) (vv.8-9), presumably so they depend solely on God.  The Twelve are commissioned to take up ministries two-by-two, with authority over unclean spirits [eksousian ton pneumaton], and they succeed in curing many (vv.7,13).  They are to preach repentance [metanoeo] (v.12).  Instructions are also given regarding the hospitality they should expect and the pointed disapproval they are to show (shaking the dust off their fee) to those who reject them (vv.10-11). 

Application: Several sermon options emerge from this text.  One possibility is to focus on Jesus’ rejection in His hometown, how often we take Him and God for granted since we have known them our whole lives, because they are always in the trenches with us (Sin).  And yet Jesus is still involved in curing us, even when we take Him for granted (Justification By Grace).  Another possibility is to note that Jesus and God take the consequences of our Sin, that our unfaith can thwart for a time the good He would do.  Evil is not caused by God (Providence).  Or preachers might focus on the call of the Disciples, how like them we have been called to get in the trenches with Him, to leave behind what we have and so will receive both the curses as well as the blessings others give to Jesus (Sanctification and Evangelism).    

Proper 11 | Ordinary Time 16, Cycle B (2015)

THEME OF THE DAY:  All are one.  In making clear that this unity is God’s Work, sermons will focus on Justification By Grace, Christ’s Work, and Providence.

Psalm 89:20-37 
The Psalm is identified as a Maskil, an artful song composed with artful skill, composed by Ethan the Ezrahite.  He was either a wise man of Solomon’s court (I Kings 4:31) or a Temple musician (I Chronicles 15:17,19).    This is a hymn extolling God’s power and faithfulness; it has its origins as part of a king’s prayer for deliverance from his enemies.  It is considered a Royal Psalm, for it portrays itself as a prayer of a king for deliverance, a national lament.

Having been defeated in battle (vv.38-45), the Psalmist refers to the anointment of David by Yahweh (v.20), the Lord’s faithfulness [emunah] is extolled (v.24), and his unalterable covenant  [berith] with David is remembered.  It is God’s Promise that David’s descendants be established forever (vv.19-26).  David is considered the Lord’s firstborn [bekov], the highest of all the kings of the earth (v.27).  The Lord pledges steadfast love [chesed or lovingkindness] for David and His covenant with him forever (vv.28-29).  If David’s heirs forsake God’s Law [torah] , Yahweh says that He will punish them, but will not remove His steadfast love (vv.30-33).  The eternity of the covenant with David is reiterated (vv.34-37).          

Application: This Psalm links nicely with the first option for the First Lesson in highlighting    the eternality of the covenant with David and his line, proclaiming God’s faithfulness and love.  Sermons might develop the theme of Justification By Grace, that God never leaves us alone or abandons us, or that God has been faithful to His Promise in the work of David’s heir Jesus (Christology).

or

Psalm 23
The famous Psalm expresses confidence in God the Shepherd’s [raah] protection.  It extols the comfort of Providence.  God is said to lead us in the paths [magal] of righteousness [tsedeq] (v.3).  It is good to remind ourselves again that the concept of “righteousness” even in an Old Testament context is not to imply that the believer lives in faultless conformity to some moral norm.  It has to do with living in right relationship with God (Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol.1, pp.370-371).  As a result, the Psalm continues, we need fear no evil [ra] (v.4).  Yahweh is compared to a gracious host (v.5).  Surrounded by goodness [tob] and mercy [chesed], the Psalmist pledges regular worship in The Temple (v.6).  This is a Psalm about gratitude to God.   

Application: The Lord as Shepherd and the comfort that brings, how like a Shepherd He keeps us together, is a sermon theme that logically grows out of this Psalm (Justification By Grace and Providence).  

2 Samuel 7:1-14a
We note again that the origin of this Book as a distinct text derives from the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures (the Septuagint), which divided the story of Israel’s monarchy into four sections (1 and 2 Samuel, and 1 and 2 Kings).  This Book is probably the result of two or three sources, culminating with the work of the Deuteronomistic (D) strand (the result of sweeping religious reforms under King Josiah in 621 BC).  The role of this last source not surprisingly entails that a central theme of the Book is the struggle to remain obedient to Torah, to be God’s covenant people, and to inherit divine blessings.  This Book especially relates to the reign of David as King of Israel.      

The Lesson accounts the story of David’s desire, expressed to the Prophet Nathan, to build a temple (vv.1-3) and what follows regarding this dream.  The Lord appears to Nathan indicating His contentment with continuing to dwell in a portable tent (vv.4-7).  This overlooks that the Ark of the Covenant had earlier been housed in a building in Shiloh (1 Samuel 1:7; 3:3).  Scholars tend to conclude that the entire pericope is a later addition to older sources, based on Psalm 89.  Others argue that, insofar as vv.6-7 seem to give no permission of the Tabernacle to be placed in a permanent building, these passages are in fact part of the earlier source. 

The Lord instructs Nathan instead to recount to David how the Lord had brought him to power, from the life of a shepherd [literally, “one who follows sheep”] to an internationally known uncontested leader (vv.8-9).  Yahweh claims that He will appoint a place for Israel from which they will no longer be disturbed and afflicted (v.10).  The establishment of a permanent Davidic dynasty is promised (vv.11b-12).  Reference is made to a Davidic offspring who would build the house of Yahweh’s Name [shem] and the throne would be established forever (v.13).  (Only in the parallel account in 1 Chronicles 28:6 is Solomon expressly designated as the one who will build the Temple.)  Yahweh promises to be a Father to the Davidic ancestor and his status as Yahweh’s Son [ben] is proclaimed (v.14a).  The promise and the desire to build a temple have close parallels to ceremonial texts of the royal house in Israel.

Application: This Lesson opens to door for sermons on the Christological implications of the Lord’s establishment of the Davidic line and also that God is not fully contained in any church.  A bigger God entails all people have some fellowship with Him (Providence).  In getting hearers of the sermon to recognize that God had greater plans in mind than David did, efforts can be made to help them appreciate that God is still in the business of giving us more than we can ever imagine (Providence).

or

Jeremiah 23:1-6
The Book is a collection of prophecies of a late seventh or early sixth century BC Prophet of Judah from the reigns of Josiah through the era of The Babylonian Captivity.  He dictated these prophecies to his aide Baruch.  Some of the Prophet’s criticism of the house of David and The Temple, giving more attention to the Sinai Covenant, may relate to his being an ancestor of one of David’s high priests, Abiathar, who lost control of the Temple and was finally banished. (I Kings 2:26-27).  Three sources of the Book have been identified: (1) An authentic poetic strand; (2) Biographic prose; and (3) Deuteronomistic redaction.  The interplay of these strands suggests that the final editors construed Jeremiah’s past prophecies as relevant in the new context.

This Complementary Lesson is a Messianic Oracle, probably part of a sermon.  The Prophet proclaims woe the shepherds who have destroyed and scattered the sheep (a reproach of Judah’s rulers (v.1).  Yahweh threatens to attend to their evil ways (v.2).  He promises to gather a remnant [sheerith] of the flock out of all the lands where he has driven them, bring them back and allow them to multiple (v.3).  He then pledges to raise up shepherds over them who will shepherd them, so that they need no longer fear or be dismayed, and none shall be missing (v.4).  Yahweh then proclaims that He will raise up for David a righteous [tsaddiq] Branch [tsemach], who will reign as king and deal wisely and execute justice [tsedaqah, literally “rightness”] in the land (v.5; cf. 33:15-16).  In making this point it is good to be reminded that the ancient Hebrew term for judgment can refer to a sense of comfort, not just to punishment [Gerhard von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol.1, p.358].)  In calling the Lord righteous, we also need to recall that Christian scholarship on the Old Testament largely agrees that God’s righteousness is not so much about a punitive attribute of God as it is about relationship, concerning God’s loyalty to His Covenant in saving us.  Sometimes the righteousness of God is even construed, as perhaps in this Psalm, as something bestowed on the faithful (von Rad, Old Testament Theology, Vol.1, pp.373,376ff.).  It is in this sense that Jeremiah can proclaim that in the Messiah’s days Judah will be saved, Israel will live in safety, and God will be called by the Name, “The Lord is our righteousness.” (v.6)

Application: A sermon on this Prophecy of Jesus might expound the concept of God’s righteousness, but it also affords an opportunity to reflect on how Jesus repairs the brokenness we all experience in Sin (Justification By Grace).

Ephesians 2:11-22
As noted last week, this Book is a circular letter, either written by Paul from prison late in his career of by a follower of the Apostle who had had a hand in assembling the collection of his Epistles.  These conclusions follow from the fact that the Letter includes vocabulary and stylistic characteristics different from the Pauline corpus.  It was likely addressed to a younger, later generation of Christians (1:15).  This Lesson is an exposition of Christ’s benefits, bringing together Gentile and Jew, with special attention to implications for Justification By Grace and Ecclesiology.

Paul notes that though the Gentiles were originally aliens [enos, literally “strangers”] from Israel, in Christ they have been brought near (vv.11-13).  Christ is said to be our Peace [eirene], breaking down the wall that had divided Jew and Gentile (v.14).  In His abolition of the Law [nomos], Christ is said to create a new humanity [anthropos] in order to reconcile the group into one Body [soma] through the Cross (vv.15-16).  Through Christ, then, we have access to the one Spirit and Father.  None are aliens, but members of the household [oikeios] of God built on the foundation [themelios] of the Apostles with Christ the cornerstone (vv.17-20).  Paul next speaks of the Church as a holy temple [katoiketerion, dwelling-place] of the Lord in which we are all joined together in the Spirit (vv.21-22).

Application: This Lesson offers an opportunity to proclaim the unity of the Church and its implications for fully including all through Christ’s breaking down the Law all barriers and bringing us near the Father (Justification By Grace).  In becoming a dwelling place of Christ, we become One with Him as well.

Mark 6:30-34,53-56
We continue again to consider a text in the first of the Synoptic Gospels to be written, a Book that was perhaps the source of other Gospels, perhaps based on oral traditions of the Passion narrative and accounts of Jesus’ sayings (the so-called Q-source).  Probably written prior to the fall of Jerusalem in 70AD, this anonymous work is traditionally ascribed to John Mark, perhaps referred to as an associate of Paul (Acts  12:12-25; 15:37; Colossians 4:10) or as Peter’s scribe (I Peter 5:13).  Some speculate that the original audience was the church in Rome (esp. Gentiles), as the Book presumes readers unfamiliar with Jewish customs and Palestinian geography (see 7:2-4,31), but it also could have been written for Palestinian Christians.  In this pericope we hear the beginning of The Feeding of the Five Thousand, with the actual miracle omitted.  All four of the Gospels include this narrative, except the final verses have no parallel in Luke.

The Lesson begins with the Disciples, having returned from their commission to preach and heal (vv.7-13), returning to Jesus, reporting, and retreating with Him to a deserted place (vv.30-32).  Many are said to have seen Jesus and His followers and followed them on land, meeting them when they docked their boat.   Going ashore Jesus saw a great crowd and had compassion on them, as they were like sheep with no shepherd (vv.33-34).  The actual feeding of the 5000 account follows (vv.35-44), along with a story of Jesus walking on water (vv.45-52).  Both accounts are omitted from the Lesson.  The account resumes with Jesus and His followers landing their boat at Gennesaret.  The crowd recognizes Him and brings the sick to Him, begging that they might touch the fringe [kraspedos] of His cloak [himation, literally “garment”] to be healed [esodzonto].  All touching His cloak were healed (vv.53-56).  (It was common belief in the Ancient Near East at the time to expect holy people to have magical powers, and so touching them to gain blessings was common.  Fringes were blue twisted threads at the four corners of male garments, intended as reminders to obey God’s Commandments [Numbers 15:38-40].)

Application: Several sermon options are suggested by this text.  One possibility is to proclaim that God’s grace and compassion heals, gives life, and gives guidance (Justification By Grace) in the midst of chaos, loneliness, and meaninglessness of our sinful reality.       

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  • SermonSuite
     
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Author of
Lectionary Scripture Notes
Mark Ellingsen is professor at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia
Dr. Mark Ellingsen

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